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rust jungle

Columbus, Ohio. Looking down. 

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO

St. Mary’s  Byzantine Rite Church. This was literally across the street from where U.S. Steel’s Ohio Works once stood. I wonder what mass was like with the sounds of an integrated steel mill playing back up to the organ? Bang clang bang woosh clang (Amen) train whistle clang clang bang maybe? Took the half block walk down here from my friend’s front porch, about a year before it burned. The shot of the burning church is courtesy of Nicholas Serra. 

http://www.wfmj.com/story/23869949/fire-destroys-historic-youngstown-church

Abandoned Coal Tipple - Girard Ohio

I’ve always been fascinated with this building, it was one of the first abandoned industrial areas I photographed. I climbed out on the roof of the little sub building before but my crazy ass cousin went to the top of the building that was blown over in a wind storm. The rotted rusted old iron spiral stairs were too sketchy for me even then but he made it. Actually being under the leaning tower yesterday was pretty sketchy too. While I was down there I was thinking the obvious metaphor for the crumbling American heavy industrial complex would make a good caption, then a train came out of Brier Hill loaded with seamless steel pipe made in Youngstown. There’s something to be said for the contrast.

Weirton Steel. Weirton WV. These are pretty old, took them while they were tearing down the blooming mill building. I was one of, if not the, last person to photograph the engine that drove the blooming mill (last photo). That TWENTY FIVE THOUSAND HORSEPOWER monster I was standing on was built by the William Tod Company. It was built in the big grey mill building under the Market Street bridge in beautiful Youngstown, Ohio. You know the historic building the downtown gentrifiers want torn down to build a dog park or something. There are 2 Tod engines left in the world, one of them is preserved on Hubbard road if you wanted to see how insanely massive they are. http://www.todengine.org/

I got the chance to go to the Carrie blast furnaces, which are pretty much all thats left of US Steel’s Homestead works in Pittsburgh. Same mill my dad hauled his second load of steel out of. I went with the guys from http://acousticarchives.com/ They documented the acoustics in different parts of the mill, and let me do the same with my camera. This video shows the same beat which changes from room to room as if it was recorded in the cast house, in a hot metal rail car or under the highline etc etc http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vw2N1tKJGKA pretty damn cool plus historically significant. If the mill wasnt deafeningly loud when it ran thats how the guys voices would have echoed. Glad I got to be a part of this.

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO: The projectors at the Paramount theater, which is the big building they are demolishing downtown. http://www.vindy.com/news/2013/jul/10/curtains-for-paramount-theatre/  I took this the first day I had a real camera, also the first day I ever used one. A dlsr anyways. I have some of the main room and stage but since i didnt know what i was doing they kind of suck. Plus everybody that ever hung out at cedars seems to have taken those same pictures.

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO: The projectors at the Paramount theater, which is the big building they are demolishing downtown. http://www.vindy.com/news/2013/jul/10/curtains-for-paramount-theatre/  I took this the first day I had a real camera, also the first day I ever used one. A dlsr anyways. I have some of the main room and stage but since i didnt know what i was doing they kind of suck. Plus everybody that ever hung out at cedars seems to have taken those same pictures.

Millfield Coal Mine Disaster: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millfield_Mine_disaster  Found this place completely by accident. My buddy had to go somewhere in southern Ohio and it was nice out so I grabbed my camera and called it a road trip. We were somewhere down near Athens and we see a sign that just says “Mine Disaster ->” so we turn and follow these signs through these backroads and see the smokestack. There was a historical marker right near the stack so I hop out and tell my buddy ill call him in a few. Turns out this is a place where 82 men died. 4 executives that made big news and 78 guys that the coal company didnt give a fuck about. Lots of fathers and sons too, i read the obituaries. It was kind of disturbing being down there by myself and ive been in some fucked up places. Walking thru the town you could tell it died when they closed the mines. People live there still; it reminded me of walkin down Steel St, just more poverty

just so happens the same mobile BBQ lunatics w the truck are out front of the bar. now we’re making cash deals #slabs #slab

this fuckin guy is BBQing on a trailer doin 45 thru the heart of Columbus so that’s what’s happening in the state capital

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO: The top photo looks like an old dock on a beach somewhere, but its whats left of conveyor belts (middle row) and the flooded basement left over from tearing down US Steel’s Ohio Works (bottom row). I took these so long ago man the photos from the roof of the mill have to be at least 5 years old. shit that was the time me and my cousin Matt got caught by the security guard. guy was hostile at first because people had been mercilessly scrapping the place, plus he didnt believe that somebody wanted to photograph the ruins before they tore it down.. i tell him my whole family was steelworkers i grew up on hazelwood could see the smoke stacks from my house etc etc and it turns out he was some big shot at the mill when it was running and the head of security after it was abandoned. guy offered us a tour of the place when he found out i knew his granddaughter but we didnt take him up on it. thats a big regret of mine. they tore everything down like 6 months later. dont mind me though im just thinking out loud